Legal Weddings in Bali

One of the most important questions we ask couples when they first contact us about having their wedding in Bali is what kind of wedding they want to have.

Now some people get confused by this and don’t really understand the difference so let us take the time to cover all you need to know.

When you choose to marry in a foreign country there are many things you need to consider, not just what type of flowers you want or where you will have the wedding but also what are the legal requirements for getting married in that country?

First let me explain the legal side of things if you choose to do it in Bali, in another post, we cover commitment ceremonies.

First of all, Indonesia only recognizes the following religious ceremonies to be legal and each religion has their own requirements separate to what the Indonesian government need.

– Protestant (Recommended), Catholic, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu

Now, there are set requirements that must be provided in order to qualify for the above types of weddings. Lets start at the top and work our way down.

Requirements for all legal weddings in Bali.

All legal weddings in Bali will need to be overseen by a government official, once the minister of religion has completed their ceremony, the government official will then do a second brief ceremony to make it all legal and you will be presented two marriage certificates. One is from the church and one is from the government which is the legal certificate you will use back home to change your name (if you choose to do so) and prove you are married.

Documents required:

Certificate of no impediment from the Australian embassy (or country of citizenship). This certificate is required by the bride and the groom to confirm that you are legally not already married, over the age of consent and are free to marry. This can be obtained at the Australian Embassy in Bali by booking an appointment for a minimum of two business days prior to the wedding, the current cost of this is $110 AUD per person and is to be paid in IDR on the day. You will need to present the following at the consulate – Passport, copy of decree absolute if divorced, copy death certificate of former spouse if applicable, copy of documentary evidence of any name changes if applicable, birth certificate.

Six passport sized photos with a red background of the bride and groom side by side. The groom must be on the right of the bride in a collared shirt and bride must have shoulders covered. This is for your certificate of marriage.

– Copy of the bride and groom’s documents. Passports, birth certificates as well as a copy of two witnesses’ passports sent to your wedding planner prior to arriving in Bali (two months prior recommended) to lodge with the relevant parties.

– Filled out application and booking form which can be obtained from your wedding planner.

– Government official booked to oversee wedding ceremony performed by minister of religion and then perform the legal ceremony.

Legal Protestant wedding

This is by far the easiest and most accessible type of legal wedding in Bali for foreigners to be able to do and I recommend this to all couples wanting to marry legally in Bali.

Extra Requirements for Protestant Legal Wedding

– Filled out application and booking form for Protestant church which can be obtained from your wedding planner.

– Protestant priest booked for wedding to perform wedding ceremony.

Catholic Legal wedding

This is originally what I wanted for my wedding, but when I realized all the hoops we had to jump through and paperwork required it was just way too hard, see for yourself why:

– Ceremony must take place in Catholic church in Bali, no other venue.

– Copy of bride and groom’s baptism certificates.

– Copy of baptism certificates for two witnesses.

– Liberth / single-status letter from priest in your country.

– Pre-marriage counseling course certificate from priest in your country.

– Canon investigation from priest in your country.

– Delegation letter from priest in your country to priest in Bali giving consent to marry you  and lead your wedding ceremony.

– Dispensation letter from priest in your country to priest in Bali with permission for different religion wedding.

– Catholic Priest booked for your wedding at the catholic church in Bali, donation to church.

Please note if either the bride or groom are divorced they will not be able to marry under the Catholic church.

Muslim legal wedding

– Documents to show Muslim is bride and grooms religion, conversion certificate if applicable.

– Must be carried out by  a member of the Kantor Urusan Agama.

– Dowry to be paid bride’s family.

– Additional photos on a blue background of the bride and groom by themselves.

Changing Your Name in Australia

First change your name on your driver’s license or ID, once this is done it is a lot easier to change your name with banks, Medicare etc. You will just need to present your marriage certificates at the license office in your state.

Now your passport is a bit more difficult if you are married overseas as you will need to apply for an RBDM change of name certificate in order in your state to change your name on your passport. This will be at a cost of about $160 AUD. For more information please refer to –https://www.passports.gov.au/web/requirements/namechangemarriage.aspx

Summary

Costs of legal wedding roughly not including venue or inclusions –

Priest of religion – $350

Government official – $150

Certificate of no impediment for couple- $220

Change of name certificate for passport for bride – $160

Driver for day to arrange CNI, photos etc – $50

Total estimated cost – $880

In reading all of the above you may feel a bit overwhelmed or out of debt, don’t worry that is perfectly normal. At Bali Brides we will help with all of the above should you choose to have a full legal wedding, including booking relevant services, helping with paper work and even taking you to the consulate and to get photos done prior to your wedding day. For more information or to book please email [email protected] or see www.balibrides.com.au

Thanks

Tristan